LES TOILES MUSICALES #3
Masterpieces from the Musee de Picardie
 

In this opus of Toiles Musicales  dedicated to the Picardy Museum , Bertrand Coynault stages the museum's masterpieces by exploring several themes.
This project, developed in partnership with the Musée de Picardie, offers the public the opportunity to discover in an original way the richness of the collections of which the public has been private for several years.

Journey to the 18th century  

The program begins with an immersion of the senses in the French eighteenth century with the desire to create a dialogue between paintings that have been able to rub shoulders with the works of the two great musical figures of the century, François Couperin and Jean-Philippe Rameau .

The dream universe  

The night and the world of dreams are fascinating and highly developed themes in both pictorial art and music, where the master of the genre is Frédéric Chopin . Each of the six nocturnes with a very distinct personality, chosen to accompany a major canvas from the collections of the Musée de Picardie, reveals its correspondence through an atmosphere that is sometimes disturbing, sensual and phantasmagoric.

Orientalism  

The Orient was a very widespread source of inspiration in the 19th century. It is most often the fantasized Western vision of a culture associated with a rather vague geographical area in the minds of contemporaries of the time, which we could define today from the Middle East to the Andalusia , via the Maghreb .

Associating the Spanish composer Enrique Granados with this theme makes it possible to match the sounds referring to Arabic music, with a selection of magnificent orientalist paintings.

 

Archaism and romanticism, the universe of Rachmaninoff  

This last theme invites you to immerse yourself in the world of Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff . Coming from the aristocracy, this romantic figure had to flee the Bolshevik revolution in 1918 to settle in the United States. His inspiration stems from his own life: family dramas, the evocation of large natural spaces, incense and Orthodox religion, from which surely comes his desire to make the piano ring like a set of bells , which constitutes a real sound signature.